Tradições de Ano Novo pelo mundo

Algumas dessas tradições, nós tbm fazemos no Brasil, outras já estudamos durante as aulas. Vale conferir e praticar sua leitura.

Many New Year traditions that we take for granted actually date back to ancient times. This year, ring out the old and ring in the new with a new New Year tradition—or two!

MAKE SOME NOISE

Making a lot of noise—from fireworks to gun shots to church bells—seems to be a favorite pastime around the world.

• In ancient Thailand, guns were fired to frighten off demons.

• In China, firecrackers routed the forces of darkness.

• In the early American colonies, the sound of pistol shots rang through the air.

• Today, Italians let their church bells peal, the Swiss beat drums, and the North Americans sound sirens and party horns to bid the old year farewell.

EAT LUCKY FOOD

Many New Year traditions surround food. Here are a few:

• The tradition of eating 12 grapes at midnight comes from Spain. Revelers stuff their mouths with 12 grapes in the final moments of the year—one grape for every chime of the clock!

• In the southern US, black-eyed peas and pork foretell good fortune. See our recipe for Good Luck Hoppin’ John!

• In Scotland—where Hogmanay is celebrated—people parade down the streets swinging balls of fire.

• Eating any ring-shaped treat (such as a doughnut) symbolizes “coming full circle” and leads to good fortune. In Dutch homes, fritters called olie bollen are served.

• The Irish enjoy pastries called bannocks.

• In India and Pakistan, rice promises prosperity.

• Apples dipped in honey are a Rosh Hashanah (Jewish New Year) tradition.

• In Swiss homes, dollops of whipped cream, symbolizing the richness of the year to come, are dropped on the floors—and allowed to remain there!

HAVE A DRINK

Although the pop of a champagne cork signals the arrival of the New Year around the world, some countries have their own beverage-based traditions.

Wassail, a punch-like drink named after the Gaelic term for “good health,” is served in some parts of England.

• Spiced “hot pint” is the Scottish version of Wassail. Traditionally, the Scots drank to each others’ prosperity and also offered this warm drink to neighbors along with a small gift.

• In Holland, toasts are made with hot, spiced wine.

GIVE A GIFT

New Year’s Day was once the time to swap presents.

• Gifts of gilded nuts or coins marked the start of the new year in Rome.

• Eggs, the symbol of fertility, were exchanged by the Persians.

• Early Egyptians traded earthenware flasks.

• In Scotland, coal, shortbread and silverware were traditionally exchanged for good luck.

PUT YOUR BEST FOOT FORWARD

In Scotland, the custom of first-footing is an important part of the celebration of Hogmanay, or New Year’s Eve Day.

After midnight, family and friends visit each other’s home. The “first foot” to cross a threshold after midnight will predict the next year’s fortune. Although the tradition varies, those deemed especially fortunate as “first footers” are new brides, new mothers, those who are tall and dark (and

handsome?) or anyone born on January 1.

TURN OVER A NEW LEAF

The dawn of a new year is an opportune time to take stock of your life.

• Jews who observe Rosh Hashanah make time for personal introspection and prayer, as well as visiting graves.

• Christian churches hold “watch-night” services, a custom that began in 1770 at Old St. Georges Methodist Church in Philadelphia.

• The practice of making New Year’s resolutions, said to have begun with the Babylonians as early as 2600 B.C., is another way to reflect on the past and plan ahead.

NEW YEAR’S FOLKLORE

Some customs and beliefs are simply passed down through the ages. Here are some of our favorite age-old sayings and proverbs.

• On New Year’s Eve, kiss the person you hope to keep kissing.

• If New Year’s Eve night wind blow south, It betokeneth warmth and growth.

• For abundance in the new year, fill your pockets and cupboards today.

• If the old year goes out like a lion, the new year will come in like a lamb.

• Begin the new year square with every man. [i.e., pay your debts!] –Robert B. Thomas, founder of The Old Farmer’s Almanac

So, whether we resolve to return borrowed farm equipment (as did the Babylonians) or drop a few pounds, we’re tapping into an ancient and powerful longing for a fresh start!

HAPPY NEW YEAR!!!!

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Citações Favoritas de Madre Teresa

A Little Something …
Favorite quotes from Mother Teresa:
“The hunger for love is much more difficult to remove than the hunger for bread.”
“If you can’t feed a hundred people, then feed just one.”
“Let us always meet each other with a smile, for the smile is the beginning of love.”
“We ourselves feel that what we are doing is just a drop in the ocean. But the ocean would be less because of that missing drop.”
“Be faithful in small things because it is in them that your strength lies.”
“Spread love everywhere you go. Let no one ever come to you without leaving happier.”
“We shall never know all the good that a simple smile can do.”
“Every time you smile at someone, it is an action of love, a gift to that person, a beautiful thing.”
Source: editor@activityvillage.co.uk
Em Português

Um pouco de algo …
Citações favoritas de Madre Teresa:

“A fome de amor é muito mais difícil de remover do que a fome de pão”.

“Se você não pode alimentar uma centena de pessoas, então alimente apenas uma”.

“Vamos sempre nos conhecer com um sorriso, pois o sorriso é o começo do amor”.

“Nós mesmos sentimos que o que estamos fazendo é apenas uma gota no oceano. Mas o oceano seria menor por causa dessa gota perdida”.

“Seja fiel em pequenas coisas porque é nelas que a sua força está”.

“Espalhe o amor em qualquer lugar que você vá. Não deixe ninguém vir até você sem deixa-lo mais feliz”.

“Nunca seremos capazes de saber  tudo o que um simples sorriso pode fazer”.

“Toda vez que você sorri para alguém, é uma ação de amor, um presente para essa pessoa, uma coisa bonita”.

Palavras de sabedoria ao redor do mundo

Words of Wisdom from Around the World …
10 proverbs from around the world.

🔷"Slippery ground does not recognise a king."
Kenyan proverb – meaning that even the most powerful people are just human.

🔶"The pillow is the best advisor."
Swedish proverb – meaning that it is always a good idea to "sleep on it" or sleep on a problem.

🔹"A frog in a well does not know the great sea."
Japanese proverb – meaning that there might be more going on than you know about. Try to look at the big picture.

🔶"If the world flooded, it wouldn't matter to the duck."
Turkish proverb – meaning that a problem for you isn't necessarily a problem for everyone.

🔷"Empty barrels make the loudest noise."
Icelandic / Indonesian proverb – meaning that the loudest people aren't always the cleverest.

🔶"When spider webs unite, they can tie up a lion."
Ethiopian proverb – meaning that teamwork can conquer even the biggest problems.

🔷"A bad ballerina blames the hem of her skirt."
Polish proverb – meaning that some people will blame anything rather than themselves for their shortcomings.

🔶"A monkey dressed in silk is still a monkey."
Spanish proverb – meaning that you can cover up what's underneath, but you won't change it.

🔷"The honey only sticks to the moustache of he who licked it."
Arabic proverb – meaning that you can't escape from a crime; evidence will follow you around.

🔶"Shrimp that fall asleep are carried away by the current."
Colombian proverb – meaning, you snooze, you lose!

Source: Activity Village

Em Português
Palavras de sabedoria de todo o mundo …
Esta semana, juntei 10 provérbios de todo o mundo. Alguns me fizeram rir e pensei que fossem divertidas para compartilhar com as crianças.

"Terra escorregadia não reconhece um rei".
Provérbio queniano – o que significa que mesmo as pessoas mais poderosas são apenas humanas.

"O travesseiro é o melhor conselheiro".
Proverbio sueco – o que significa que é sempre uma boa idéia "dormir sobre ele" ou dormir em um problema.

"Um sapo em um poço não conhece o grande mar".
Provérbio japonês – o que significa que pode haver mais acontecimentos do que você sabe. Tente olhar o quadro geral.

"Se o mundo inundasse, não seria importante para o pato".
Proverbio turco – o que significa que um problema para você não é necessariamente um problema para todos.

"Barris vazios fazem o barulho mais alto".
Provérbio islandês / indonésio – o que significa que as pessoas mais altas nem sempre são as mais inteligentes.

"Quando as telhas de aranha se unem, podem amarrar um leão".
Proverbio etíope – o que significa que o trabalho em equipe pode conquistar até mesmo os maiores problemas.

"Uma bailarina ruim culpa a bainha de sua saia".
Provérbio polonês – o que significa que algumas pessoas culparão qualquer coisa em vez de elas mesmas por suas falhas.

"Um macaco vestido de seda ainda é um macaco".
Provérbio espanhol – o que significa que você pode encobrir o que está embaixo, mas você não vai mudar isso.

"O mel só adere ao bigode daquele que o lambeu".
Provérbio árabe – o que significa que você não pode escapar de um crime; A evidência irá segui-lo ao redor.

"Os camarões que dormem são levados pela correnteza".
Provérbio colombiano – o que significa que você dorme, você perde!

Fonte: Activity Village

Dealing with errors in class

Como devemos proceder quando nossos alunos cometem erros ao falar ou ao escrever? Devemos corrigi los no momento em que cometem o erro, devemos esperar e comentar sobre o erro depois ou ainda não comentamos sobre nada e deixamos que o tempo se encarregue disso? Em grupo ou individualmente?

Essa é uma dúvida difícil e muitos professores não saber como proceder! 

Segue alguns conselhos e dicas de especialistas: 

Dealing with errors in class
Teachers often correct spoken errors as soon as they hear them, sometimes called immediate or on the spot error correction.
This has both advantages and disadvantages. Consider the following:
Advantages Disadvantages

Learner is aware of their error Can affect learner confidence. They may feel embarrassed or unwilling to speak.

Learner might have the opportunity to correct their own error (if the teacher prompts them to) Learner may not be able to get their message across due to interruptions, so communication is impeded.

Can improve accuracy Has a negative effect on fluency

For on-the-spot correction, you can:

– Help the learner to correct themselves (self-correction)

– Help other learners to correct the error (peer correction)

– Correct the error yourself (teacher-led correction)
Which type of on-the-spot correction do you use with your learners? (Self-correction, peer correction or teacher-led correction). Share with us!
Source: © British Council

Aprender idiomas faz o cérebro crescer

img_0102-2Você sabia disso!

Um recente estudo de uma universidade sueca descobriu que partes do cérebro de estudantes de idiomas desenvolveu e aumentou em tamanho enquanto que o dos alunos regulares, não!

Leia a matéria completa abaixo.

Language learning makes the brain grow

Have you ever thought that learning new languages would help develop your brain?

A recent study at Lund University in Sweden investigated the effect on the brains of students who were learning a new language intensively compared to other students who were studying intensively, but not languages. Remarkably, they discovered that parts of the language learners’ brains had increased in size, while this was not the case for the non-language learning group.

At the Swedish Armed Forces Interpreter Academy in the city of Uppsala, young people with a flair for languages go from having no knowledge of a language such as Arabic, Russian or Dari to speaking it fluently in the space of 13 months. From morning to evening, weekdays and weekends, the recruits study at a pace unlike on any other language course.

Young recruits learn a new language at a very fast pace. By measuring their brains before and after the language training, a group of researchers have had an almost unique opportunity to observe what happens to the brain when we learn a new language in a short period of time.

As a control group, the researchers used medicine and cognitive science students at Umea University – students who also study hard, but not languages. Both groups were given MRI scans before and after a three-month period of intensive study. While the brain structure of the control group remained unchanged, specific parts of the brain of the language students grew. The parts that developed in size were the hippocampus, a deep-lying brain structure that is involved in learning new material and spatial navigation, and three areas in the cerebral cortex.

“We were surprised that different parts of the brain developed to different degrees depending on how well the students performed and how much effort they had had to put in to keep up with the course”, says Johan Martensson, a researcher in psychology at Lund University, Sweden.

Students with greater growth in the hippocampus had better language skills than the other students. In students who had to put more effort into their learning, greater growth was seen in an area of the motor region of the cerebral cortex. The areas of the brain in which the changes take place are linked to how easy it is to learn a new language. The development varies according to individual performance.

Previous research from other groups has indicated that Alzheimer’s disease has a later onset in bilingual or multilingual groups.

“Even if we cannot compare three months of intensive language study with a lifetime of being bilingual, there is a lot to suggest that learning languages is a good way to keep the brain in shape”, says Johan Martensson.

Source: http://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/top-stories/language-learning-makes-your-brain-grow

Gerúndio ou Infinitivo?

Muitos alunos me perguntam como saber quando usar e ING ou TO na hora de escolher o tempo verbal mais apropriado . No entanto a regra é mais de memorizar do que de entender. 

Abaixo segue uma pequena lista com alguns verbos que pedem o gerúndio e outros que pedem o infinitivo.


Seguem alguns exemplos:
When two verbs are used together, the second verb is often in the gerund form (-ing) or the infinitive. There are no specific rules concerning which verbs take which form. Like irregular verbs, you will need to learn which form a verb takes.
Common Verbs + ‘ing’
go

enjoy

quit

discuss

mind

can’t stand

suggest
Examples:
They go jogging on Saturdays.

I don’t mind helping you.

They can’t stand driving in traffic jams.
Common Verbs + Infinitive
promise

plan

refuse

want

need

decide

hope
Examples:
I promised to help him.

Alice needs to start that task.

He decided to quit his job.

Seven Habits for Effective Behaviour Management:

Disciplina é um dos grandes problemas dentro de sala de aula. Leia a seguir sobre 7 efetivos hábitos para gerenciar melhor a disciplina.
dscn04171.jpg
 
1 – Meet and greet at the door – the best early intervention in behaviour management is at the door.
 
2 – Catch students doing the right thing – nobody wants insincere praise and it can be easy to catch children doing the wrong thing so develop the ability to catch those more challenging students doing the right thing.
 
3 – Deal with poor behaviour privately and calmly – avoid as much as possible the public humiliation or public sanctioning of students
 
4 – Relentlessly build mutual trust – the relationship you have with students sustains you and carries on into the future.
 
5 – Directly teach the behaviours and learning attitudes you want to see – have a plan so that you know the behaviours you are trying to teach and the students know what behaviours they are trying to learn.
 
6 – Talk about values – never talk about behaviours in isolation – always relate them back to the culture you are trying to build and the values and truths you have as a class and as a teacher.
 
7 – Follow up follow up follow up – teachers who follow up are the ones the children decide to behave differently for. Write it down if you have a difficult incident with a student, then you have the control back – you can decide when and how to follow up.
 
© Pivotal Education

Expressões Idiomáticas com “Head”

img_0102-6Saber usar ou entender expressões idiomáticas em Inglês é importante e difícil.

Seguem algumas explicações e frases com exemplos interessantes.

The following idioms and expressions use the noun ‘head’. Each idiom or expression has a definition and two example sentences to help understanding of these common idiomatic expressions with ‘head’.

able to do something standing on one’s head -> do something very easily and without effort

He’s able to count backward standing on his head.
Don’t worry about that. I can do it standing on my head.

bang your head against a brick wall -> do something without any chance of it succeeding

I’ve been banging my head against a brick wall when it comes to finding a job.
Trying to convince Kevin is like banging your head against a brick wall.

beat something into someone’s head -> teach someone something by repeating it over and over again

Sometimes you just need to beat grammar into your head.
My father beat the importance of kindness into my head.

bite someone’s head off -> criticize someone strongly

Tim bit my head off last night at the party.
Don’t bit my head off just because I made a mistake.

bring something to a head -> cause a crisis to happen

We need to bring the situation to a head to get a resolution.
The immigration situation brought the political crisis to a head.

bury one’s head in the sand -> ignore something completely

You’re going to have to face the situation and not bury your head in the sand.
He chose to bury his head in the sand and not confront her.

can’t make heads or tails out of something -> not be able to understand something

I hate to admit that I can’t make heads or tails out of this math problem.
The politicians can’t make heads or tails out of the current employment crisis. 

drum something into someone’s head -> repeat over and over until someone learns something

I had to drum German grammar into my head for two years before I could speak the language.
I suggest you drum this into your head for the test next week.

fall head over heels in love -> fall deeply in love

She fell head over heals in love with Tom.
Have you ever fallen head over heels in love?

from head to toe -> dressed or covered in something completely

He’s dressed in blue from head to toe.
She’s wearing lace from head to toe. 

get a head start on something -> begin doing something early

Let’s get a head start on the report tomorrow.
She got a head start on her homework immediately after school.

get your head above water -> keep going in life despite many difficulties

If I can find a job I’ll be able to get my head above water.
Study these pages and you’ll get your head above water.

get someone or something out of one’s head -> remove someone or something from your thoughts (often used in the negative)

I’m really upset that I can’t get her out of my head.
She spent three years getting those experiences out of her head.

give someone a head’s start -> let someone else begin before you in  a competition of some kind

I’ll give you twenty minutes head’s start.
Can you give me a head’s start?

go over someone’s head -> not be able to understand something

I’m afraid the joke went over her head.
I’m afraid the situation goes over my head. 

go to someone’s head -> make someone feel better than others

His good grades went to his head.
Don’t let your success go to your head. Stay humble.

have a good head on your shoulders -> be intelligent

She’s got a good head on her shoulders.
You can trust him because he’s got a good head on his shoulders.

head someone or something off -> arrive before someone or something else

Let’s head them off at the pass.
We need to head the problem off.

hit the nail on the head -> be exactly right about something

I think you hit the nail on the head.
His answer hit the nail on the head.

in over one’s head -> do something that is too difficult for a person

I’m afraid Peter is in over his head with Mary.
Do you ever feel that your in over your head?

lose your head -> become nervous or angry

Don’t lose your head over the situation.
She lost her head when he told her he wanted a divorce.

Source: http://esl.about.com/od/idioms-intermediate/fl/Idioms-and-Expressions-with-Head.htm?utm_content=20160927&utm_medium=email&utm_source=exp_nl&utm_campaign=list_esl&utm_term=list_esl

What does classroom management include?

Classroom management is about how you manage what happens in the class and is really important for any teacher, especially for teaching children and teenagers in large classes. Here are some of the key things that you’ll need to start thinking about to help your lessons go as smoothly as possible.

Organising the classroom

Deciding what you want to do with the chairs and desks in the class. Do you want your learners to sit in rows? In a horseshoe? Café-style sitting around tables?

Organising the learners

Deciding how you want your learners to complete an activity. Do you want them to work alone? In pairs? In groups? As a whole class?

Eliciting

Asking learners questions to find out what they know and don’t know about an idea or about language.

Giving instructions

Telling learners what you want them to do in an activity.

Checking understanding

Asking learners questions to check that they understand the meaning of language or to check that learners know what to do in an activity.

Monitoring

When learners are doing an activity on their own or in pairs/groups, the teacher walks around the room to look at or listen to what learners are doing to check that they are doing the right thing and to help when needed.

Giving feedback

Telling learners how they are doing. This could be checking the answers to an activity in class or providing some correction. It could also be talking to learners about their progress.

Boardwork

Organising your board and using the board to help learners learn.

 Nomenclatura  de cursos de língua inglesa

Glossary
During this course, you’ll find there’s a lot of terminology about English Language Teaching. Each week we’ll have a step near the end of the week with a list of key terms from the week’s activities.
Here’s the terminology from this week which is all about the world of ELT. If there are any terms which you’re not sure about, post your question below – you may find one of your fellow learners has an explanation which will help you to understand it better.
CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages)

An initial teaching qualification from Cambridge English Language Assessment. It’s frequently taken as a four-week intensive course, with input on methodology and assessed teaching practice.
EAP (English for Academic Purposes)

Teaching English to people who are preparing to take, or are taking, a university course in English. The course will cover things like essay writing, note-taking, reading skills and academic vocabulary.
EFL (English as a foreign language)

This is the subject of English when it is taught for work, study or pleasure. Learners may be studying in their own country or studying for a while in an English-speaking country before returning home. They do not intend to live permanently in an English-speaking country. EFL is the term used in European contexts.
ESL (English as a second Language)

This is the term used in the US and Canada to talk about the subject of English when it is not the learner’s first language. Learners may be in the US or Canada or they may be in their own countries.
ESP (English for Specific Purposes)

English for people who need a very specialised type of English often for their jobs. Big sectors within this are Business English, English for Tourism and English for Medicine.
General English

Classes which aim to improve learners’ overall ability to communicate in English by studying the grammar, vocabulary and pronunciation of English and developing the skills of speaking, listening, writing and reading.
TEFL (Teaching English as a foreign language)

Teaching English to learners, both overseas and in the UK, who want to learn English for work, for study or pleasure but who do not normally live or work permanently in an English-speaking country. TEFL is the term used in European contexts.
TESL (Teaching English as a second language)

The term used in the US and Canada for teaching English. It is used for both learners studying in their own country and those studying in the US or Canada and it refers to both learners who live permanently in the US or Canada and those who don’t.
TESOL (Teaching English to speakers of other languages)

The term which is used to cover all forms of English teaching to non-English speakers. The term is widely used in North America, Australia and New Zealand.
You might also find it useful to look at the TKT (Teaching Knowledge Test) Glossary (attached below). The words and phrases in the TKT Glossary includes words and phrases for teaching knowledge connected to language, language use and the background to and practice of language teaching and learning as assessed in TKT. TKT is a teaching qualification which shows teachers how they are developing as a teacher. It is ideal for people who want to prove their teaching knowledge with a globally recognised certificate.


© UCLES 2016