Dislexia e outras diferenças de aprendizado

Quais são as diferenças específicas de aprendizado?

Vários termos são usados ​​para descrever alunos com dificuldades de aprendizagem em diferentes partes do mundo. Neste breve artigo, mostramos algumas das maneiras pelas quais as dificuldades de aprendizagem são agrupadas e definidas no Reino Unido e nos Estados Unidos da América.

No passado, as dificuldades de aprendizagem foram classificadas em sub-tipos distintos, tais como:

“Dislexia” ou “deficiência de leitura”

“Disgrafia” ou “incapacidade de escrever”

“Discalculia” ou “incapacidade de aprendizagem matemática”

«Dispraxia» ou «Transtorno de coordenação do desenvolvimento» (dificuldades de coordenação de movimentos)

Estes sub-tipos de dificuldades de aprendizagem representaram diferentes áreas do desempenho acadêmico que também influenciam a vida das pessoas fora da escola. Verificou-se, no entanto, que existe uma considerável sobreposição entre estes tipos de dificuldades de aprendizagem. Isso tornou muito difícil diferenciar os vários subtipos de maneira confiável.

A solução proposta no Reino Unido foi agrupar essas várias dificuldades de aprendizagem sob o rótulo de Diferenças de Aprendizagem Específicas. O Departamento de Educação do Grupo de Trabalho no Reino Unido (2005) propôs a seguinte definição:

“Os spLDs têm dificuldades particulares, que podem incluir ortografia, adquirir habilidades fluentes de leitura e redação e / ou manipular números que podem indicar que seu desempenho está bem abaixo de suas habilidades em outras áreas. Eles também podem ter problemas de memória de trabalho, habilidades organizacionais, linguagem receptiva e expressiva ou habilidades orais e auditivas, mantendo a concentração e a coordenação. ”

Essa definição inclui dislexia, dispraxia, discalculia e transtorno de déficit de atenção. A Associação Americana de Psiquiatria tomou uma decisão semelhante no DSM-5 (Manual Diagnóstico e Estatístico de Transtornos Mentais – American Psychiatric Association, 2013) e agrupou diferentes dificuldades de aprendizagem sob o termo “transtornos de aprendizagem específicos” (SLD).

Estes incluem três subgrupos de desordem:

distúrbio de aprendizagem específico com prejuízo na leitura

expressão escrita

matemática

O SLD na leitura inclui dificuldades de leitura no nível da palavra (isto é, dislexia) e dificuldades na compreensão da leitura em nível de texto. SLD em matemática é equivalente a discalculia na definição de SpLD utilizada no Reino Unido. O SLD, por escrito, está preocupado com a exatidão ortográfica, precisão gramatical e pontuação e clareza e organização da expressão escrita, e sua contrapartida no Reino Unido é disgrafia.

No DSM-5, o transtorno do déficit de atenção e hiperatividade (TDAH) é classificado nas doenças do neurodesenvolvimento, juntamente com os Transtornos do Espectro Autista (TEA). TDAH e TEA não pertencem diretamente ao grupo de LLDs, pois seus efeitos impactam áreas mais amplas da vida cotidiana, não apenas aprendendo dentro e fora dos contextos escolares.

In English

Various terms are used to describe students with learning difficulties in different parts of the world. In this brief article we show you some of the ways in which learning difficulties are grouped and defined in the United Kingdom and in the United States of America.

In the past learning difficulties were classified into distinct sub-types such as:

• ‘dyslexia’ or ‘reading disability’

• ‘dysgraphia’ or ‘writing disability’

• ‘dyscalculia’ or ‘mathematics learning disability’

• ‘dyspraxia’ or ‘developmental co-ordination disorder’ (difficulties with co-ordination of movement)

These sub-types of learning difficulties represented different areas of academic achievement which also influence people’s lives outside school. It was found, however, that there is a considerable overlap between these types of learning difficulties. This made it very difficult to differentiate the various sub-types in a reliable manner.

The solution proposed in the United Kingdom was to group these various learning difficulties under the label of Specific Learning Differences. The Department for Education Working Group in the UK (2005) proposed the following definition:

“SpLDs have particular difficulties, which may include spelling, acquiring fluent reading and writing skills and/or manipulating numbers which may indicate their performance is well below their abilities in other areas. They may also have problems with working memory, organisational skills, receptive and expressive language or oral and auditory skills, maintaining concentration and co-ordination.”

This definition includes dyslexia, dyspraxia, dyscalculia and attention deficit disorder. The American Psychiatric Association took a similar decision in DSM-5 (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders – American Psychiatric Association, 2013) and grouped different learning difficulties under the umbrella term specific learning disorders (SLD).

These include three subgroups of disorder:

• specific learning disorder with impairment in reading

• written expression

• mathematics

SLD in reading includes word-level reading difficulties (ie dyslexia) and difficulties with text-level reading comprehension. SLD in mathematics is equivalent to dyscalculia in the SpLD definition used in the UK. SLD in writing is concerned with spelling accuracy, grammar and punctuation accuracy and clarity and organisation of written expression, and its counterpart in the UK is dysgraphia.

In DSM-5 attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is classified under neurodevelopmental disorders together with Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD). ADHD and ASD do not directly belong to the group of SpLDs as their effects impact wider areas of everyday life, not just learning in and outside school contexts.

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Tradições de Ano Novo pelo mundo

Algumas dessas tradições, nós tbm fazemos no Brasil, outras já estudamos durante as aulas. Vale conferir e praticar sua leitura.

Many New Year traditions that we take for granted actually date back to ancient times. This year, ring out the old and ring in the new with a new New Year tradition—or two!

MAKE SOME NOISE

Making a lot of noise—from fireworks to gun shots to church bells—seems to be a favorite pastime around the world.

• In ancient Thailand, guns were fired to frighten off demons.

• In China, firecrackers routed the forces of darkness.

• In the early American colonies, the sound of pistol shots rang through the air.

• Today, Italians let their church bells peal, the Swiss beat drums, and the North Americans sound sirens and party horns to bid the old year farewell.

EAT LUCKY FOOD

Many New Year traditions surround food. Here are a few:

• The tradition of eating 12 grapes at midnight comes from Spain. Revelers stuff their mouths with 12 grapes in the final moments of the year—one grape for every chime of the clock!

• In the southern US, black-eyed peas and pork foretell good fortune. See our recipe for Good Luck Hoppin’ John!

• In Scotland—where Hogmanay is celebrated—people parade down the streets swinging balls of fire.

• Eating any ring-shaped treat (such as a doughnut) symbolizes “coming full circle” and leads to good fortune. In Dutch homes, fritters called olie bollen are served.

• The Irish enjoy pastries called bannocks.

• In India and Pakistan, rice promises prosperity.

• Apples dipped in honey are a Rosh Hashanah (Jewish New Year) tradition.

• In Swiss homes, dollops of whipped cream, symbolizing the richness of the year to come, are dropped on the floors—and allowed to remain there!

HAVE A DRINK

Although the pop of a champagne cork signals the arrival of the New Year around the world, some countries have their own beverage-based traditions.

Wassail, a punch-like drink named after the Gaelic term for “good health,” is served in some parts of England.

• Spiced “hot pint” is the Scottish version of Wassail. Traditionally, the Scots drank to each others’ prosperity and also offered this warm drink to neighbors along with a small gift.

• In Holland, toasts are made with hot, spiced wine.

GIVE A GIFT

New Year’s Day was once the time to swap presents.

• Gifts of gilded nuts or coins marked the start of the new year in Rome.

• Eggs, the symbol of fertility, were exchanged by the Persians.

• Early Egyptians traded earthenware flasks.

• In Scotland, coal, shortbread and silverware were traditionally exchanged for good luck.

PUT YOUR BEST FOOT FORWARD

In Scotland, the custom of first-footing is an important part of the celebration of Hogmanay, or New Year’s Eve Day.

After midnight, family and friends visit each other’s home. The “first foot” to cross a threshold after midnight will predict the next year’s fortune. Although the tradition varies, those deemed especially fortunate as “first footers” are new brides, new mothers, those who are tall and dark (and

handsome?) or anyone born on January 1.

TURN OVER A NEW LEAF

The dawn of a new year is an opportune time to take stock of your life.

• Jews who observe Rosh Hashanah make time for personal introspection and prayer, as well as visiting graves.

• Christian churches hold “watch-night” services, a custom that began in 1770 at Old St. Georges Methodist Church in Philadelphia.

• The practice of making New Year’s resolutions, said to have begun with the Babylonians as early as 2600 B.C., is another way to reflect on the past and plan ahead.

NEW YEAR’S FOLKLORE

Some customs and beliefs are simply passed down through the ages. Here are some of our favorite age-old sayings and proverbs.

• On New Year’s Eve, kiss the person you hope to keep kissing.

• If New Year’s Eve night wind blow south, It betokeneth warmth and growth.

• For abundance in the new year, fill your pockets and cupboards today.

• If the old year goes out like a lion, the new year will come in like a lamb.

• Begin the new year square with every man. [i.e., pay your debts!] –Robert B. Thomas, founder of The Old Farmer’s Almanac

So, whether we resolve to return borrowed farm equipment (as did the Babylonians) or drop a few pounds, we’re tapping into an ancient and powerful longing for a fresh start!

HAPPY NEW YEAR!!!!

Palavras de sabedoria ao redor do mundo

Words of Wisdom from Around the World …
10 proverbs from around the world.

🔷"Slippery ground does not recognise a king."
Kenyan proverb – meaning that even the most powerful people are just human.

🔶"The pillow is the best advisor."
Swedish proverb – meaning that it is always a good idea to "sleep on it" or sleep on a problem.

🔹"A frog in a well does not know the great sea."
Japanese proverb – meaning that there might be more going on than you know about. Try to look at the big picture.

🔶"If the world flooded, it wouldn't matter to the duck."
Turkish proverb – meaning that a problem for you isn't necessarily a problem for everyone.

🔷"Empty barrels make the loudest noise."
Icelandic / Indonesian proverb – meaning that the loudest people aren't always the cleverest.

🔶"When spider webs unite, they can tie up a lion."
Ethiopian proverb – meaning that teamwork can conquer even the biggest problems.

🔷"A bad ballerina blames the hem of her skirt."
Polish proverb – meaning that some people will blame anything rather than themselves for their shortcomings.

🔶"A monkey dressed in silk is still a monkey."
Spanish proverb – meaning that you can cover up what's underneath, but you won't change it.

🔷"The honey only sticks to the moustache of he who licked it."
Arabic proverb – meaning that you can't escape from a crime; evidence will follow you around.

🔶"Shrimp that fall asleep are carried away by the current."
Colombian proverb – meaning, you snooze, you lose!

Source: Activity Village

Em Português
Palavras de sabedoria de todo o mundo …
Esta semana, juntei 10 provérbios de todo o mundo. Alguns me fizeram rir e pensei que fossem divertidas para compartilhar com as crianças.

"Terra escorregadia não reconhece um rei".
Provérbio queniano – o que significa que mesmo as pessoas mais poderosas são apenas humanas.

"O travesseiro é o melhor conselheiro".
Proverbio sueco – o que significa que é sempre uma boa idéia "dormir sobre ele" ou dormir em um problema.

"Um sapo em um poço não conhece o grande mar".
Provérbio japonês – o que significa que pode haver mais acontecimentos do que você sabe. Tente olhar o quadro geral.

"Se o mundo inundasse, não seria importante para o pato".
Proverbio turco – o que significa que um problema para você não é necessariamente um problema para todos.

"Barris vazios fazem o barulho mais alto".
Provérbio islandês / indonésio – o que significa que as pessoas mais altas nem sempre são as mais inteligentes.

"Quando as telhas de aranha se unem, podem amarrar um leão".
Proverbio etíope – o que significa que o trabalho em equipe pode conquistar até mesmo os maiores problemas.

"Uma bailarina ruim culpa a bainha de sua saia".
Provérbio polonês – o que significa que algumas pessoas culparão qualquer coisa em vez de elas mesmas por suas falhas.

"Um macaco vestido de seda ainda é um macaco".
Provérbio espanhol – o que significa que você pode encobrir o que está embaixo, mas você não vai mudar isso.

"O mel só adere ao bigode daquele que o lambeu".
Provérbio árabe – o que significa que você não pode escapar de um crime; A evidência irá segui-lo ao redor.

"Os camarões que dormem são levados pela correnteza".
Provérbio colombiano – o que significa que você dorme, você perde!

Fonte: Activity Village

Expressões Idiomáticas com “Head”

img_0102-6Saber usar ou entender expressões idiomáticas em Inglês é importante e difícil.

Seguem algumas explicações e frases com exemplos interessantes.

The following idioms and expressions use the noun ‘head’. Each idiom or expression has a definition and two example sentences to help understanding of these common idiomatic expressions with ‘head’.

able to do something standing on one’s head -> do something very easily and without effort

He’s able to count backward standing on his head.
Don’t worry about that. I can do it standing on my head.

bang your head against a brick wall -> do something without any chance of it succeeding

I’ve been banging my head against a brick wall when it comes to finding a job.
Trying to convince Kevin is like banging your head against a brick wall.

beat something into someone’s head -> teach someone something by repeating it over and over again

Sometimes you just need to beat grammar into your head.
My father beat the importance of kindness into my head.

bite someone’s head off -> criticize someone strongly

Tim bit my head off last night at the party.
Don’t bit my head off just because I made a mistake.

bring something to a head -> cause a crisis to happen

We need to bring the situation to a head to get a resolution.
The immigration situation brought the political crisis to a head.

bury one’s head in the sand -> ignore something completely

You’re going to have to face the situation and not bury your head in the sand.
He chose to bury his head in the sand and not confront her.

can’t make heads or tails out of something -> not be able to understand something

I hate to admit that I can’t make heads or tails out of this math problem.
The politicians can’t make heads or tails out of the current employment crisis. 

drum something into someone’s head -> repeat over and over until someone learns something

I had to drum German grammar into my head for two years before I could speak the language.
I suggest you drum this into your head for the test next week.

fall head over heels in love -> fall deeply in love

She fell head over heals in love with Tom.
Have you ever fallen head over heels in love?

from head to toe -> dressed or covered in something completely

He’s dressed in blue from head to toe.
She’s wearing lace from head to toe. 

get a head start on something -> begin doing something early

Let’s get a head start on the report tomorrow.
She got a head start on her homework immediately after school.

get your head above water -> keep going in life despite many difficulties

If I can find a job I’ll be able to get my head above water.
Study these pages and you’ll get your head above water.

get someone or something out of one’s head -> remove someone or something from your thoughts (often used in the negative)

I’m really upset that I can’t get her out of my head.
She spent three years getting those experiences out of her head.

give someone a head’s start -> let someone else begin before you in  a competition of some kind

I’ll give you twenty minutes head’s start.
Can you give me a head’s start?

go over someone’s head -> not be able to understand something

I’m afraid the joke went over her head.
I’m afraid the situation goes over my head. 

go to someone’s head -> make someone feel better than others

His good grades went to his head.
Don’t let your success go to your head. Stay humble.

have a good head on your shoulders -> be intelligent

She’s got a good head on her shoulders.
You can trust him because he’s got a good head on his shoulders.

head someone or something off -> arrive before someone or something else

Let’s head them off at the pass.
We need to head the problem off.

hit the nail on the head -> be exactly right about something

I think you hit the nail on the head.
His answer hit the nail on the head.

in over one’s head -> do something that is too difficult for a person

I’m afraid Peter is in over his head with Mary.
Do you ever feel that your in over your head?

lose your head -> become nervous or angry

Don’t lose your head over the situation.
She lost her head when he told her he wanted a divorce.

Source: http://esl.about.com/od/idioms-intermediate/fl/Idioms-and-Expressions-with-Head.htm?utm_content=20160927&utm_medium=email&utm_source=exp_nl&utm_campaign=list_esl&utm_term=list_esl

Aprenda Inglês no 2o Semestre

Não desista de seu sonho de falar Inglês

PARA

  • Viajar sozinho ao exterior;
  • Conseguir um emprego melhor;
  • Navegar na Internet com facilidade;
  • Falar com fluência com estrangeiros;
  • Passar num exame de proficiência;
  • Possibilitar aos seus filhos um aprendizado bilíngue;
  • Enfim, curtir um novo aprendizado.

Ainda há tempo. Você merece!

Fale comigo e aprenda no seu ritmo, com uma profissional exclusiva para as suas necessidades.

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Terminology for Reading and Listening

img_0102-4

Reading for gist/Skimming

Reading quickly to get a general understanding of a written text, eg reading a description of a city to find out if it sounds like somewhere you’d like to visit.

Reading for specific information/Scanning

Searching for a particular piece of information in a written text, eg reading a description of a city only to find out which country it’s in.

Reading/listening for detail

Reading or listening more carefully so that you get a full understanding of the text, eg reading a description of a city to find out everything about it.

Listening for gist

Getting a general understanding of something you hear, eg listening to the weather forecast and deciding you might need to take an umbrella when you go out.

Listening for specific information

Listening for a particular piece of information, eg listening to the weather forecast to find out what the temperature will be tomorrow.

Inferring meaning

Making guesses about what is not stated explicitly in a text, eg listening or reading a conversation and deciding that the people are brother and sister without them saying so.

Coherence

Organising ideas in a logical way when speaking or writing so that the listener or reader can follow our ideas.

Cohesion

Joining sentences together using words like and, but and because so our language flows more easily.

Interactive strategies

Strategies we use when we are speaking, eg showing you are listening to other people by saying things like, mmmm or uh-uh or oh!

Turn taking

An interactive strategy which is about knowing when you can join in a conversation and signalling when you think someone else should speak.

Fluency

For speaking; this is speaking without a lot of hesitation and too many long pauses. For writing; this means you can write without stopping for a long time to think about what to write.