Sobre Amor 💝 ❤️

It’s All About Love …

“They invented hugs to let people know you love them without saying anything.”

Bil Keane

“All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn’t hurt.”

Charles M Schulz

“The Eskimos had fifty-two names for snow because it was important to them: there ought to be as many for love.”

Margaret Atwood

“Only from the heart can you touch the sky.”

Rumi

“The law of love could be best understood and learned through little children.”

Mahatma Gandhi

“It didn’t matter how big our house was; it mattered that there was love in it.”

Peter Buffett

Q: What do you call a very small valentine?

A: A valentiny!

Source: https://www.activityvillage.co.uk/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=general

Em português

É tudo sobre amor …

“Eles inventaram abraços para que as pessoas saibam que você os ama sem dizer nada”.

Bil Keane

“Tudo o que você precisa é amor. Mas um pouco de chocolate de vez em quando não dói”.

Charles M Schulz

“Os esquimós tinham cinquenta e dois nomes para a neve porque era importante para eles: deveria haver tantos para o amor”.

Margaret Atwood

“Somente do coração você pode tocar o céu”.

Rumi

“A lei do amor pode ser melhor compreendida e aprendida através de crianças pequenas”.

Mahatma Gandhi

“Não importava o tamanho da nossa casa, importava que houvesse amor nela”.

Peter Buffett

P: O que você chama de namorada muito pequena?

R: Uma namoradinha!

Fonte: https://www.activityvillage.co.uk/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=general

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Ano Chinês do Cachorro

Um conto para celebrar o Ano Novo Chinês

The Emperor of Ch’in Shih Huang-ti

Built a wall

From the hills to the sea.

He built it wide,

He built it stout,

To keep his subjects in

And the Tartars out.

The Emperor of Ch’in.

Meng Jiangnu, one sad day

From her own dear home

A thousand leagues away

To the wall did come.

Weary and worn

She wept and she cried:

“Where is my dear love Buried inside?”

She wept and she cried

And her tears did fall,

Till down, down tumbled

That great big wall.

Em Português

O Imperador de Ch’in Shih Huang-ti

Construí uma parede

Das colinas ao mar.

Ele o construiu de largura,

Ele o construiu forte,

Para manter seus assuntos em

E os tártaros estão fora.

O Imperador de Ch’in.

Meng Jiangnu, um dia triste

De sua própria casa querida

A mil leguas de distância

Chegou à parede.

Cansada e desgastada

Ela chorou e ela chorou:

“Onde está meu querido amor enterrado dentro?”

Ela chorou e ela chorou

E suas lágrimas caíram,

Até embaixo, caiu

Esse grande muro grande.

Alunos que se formaram em 2017

Alguns de meus queridos alunos que com esforço e dedicação terminaram mais um ano letivo. Parabéns a todos!

Ten tips for keeping your heart healthy

Coronary heart disease is the biggest killer causing many deaths each year. More than a quarter of the deaths occur in people who are younger than 75 and experts say the majority are preventable.

1. Buy a blender

The World Health Organization recommends eating a minimum of 400g of fruit and veg a day to lower the risk of serious health problems, such as heart disease. Easier said than done? By throwing some fruit in the blender and starting the day with a tasty juice or smoothie, you’ll have hit your five a day target before you’ve even left for work. And with so many great combinations to try (butternut squash, ginger and date anyone?), you’ll soon be hooked.

2. Say no to tobacco

Smoking is one of the main causes of coronary heart disease. According to the NHS, a year after giving up, your risk of a heart attack falls to about half that of a smoker. And your bank balance won’t look so bad either! Ditching the ciggies can be tricky so speak to your doctor.

3. Ditch the bus for the bike

To keep the heart healthy, it is recommended that adults aged 19-64 fit in 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity a week. It sounds like a lot but broken down that’s 30 minutes of activity on five days of the week. If you can, running, cycling or walking to work is a great way to squeeze it in without taking time out of your day. You’ll impress your colleagues too.

4. Walk the dog

Taking the dog out for a walk is another brilliant way to get fresh air and daily exercise. Don’t have a pooch? Why not borrow a friend or neighbour’s furry friend? You’ll be doing them a favour, and you get some company while you exercise. Just don’t expect great conversation.

5. Fish Fridays

Cold water fish such as mackerel, sardines, tuna and salmon are a rich source of omega-3 fats, which can help protect against heart disease. Try swapping meat out for fish a few days of the week. Cod luck!

6. Go nuts

Walnuts, almonds, peanuts, and other nuts are packed with mono-unsaturated, heart-friendly fats, and studies show they help to lower the bad form of cholesterol. Grab a handful instead of crisps or chocolate when you feel peckish, and sprinkle them on top of salads or cereal for a tasty crunch.

No pressure, but Barry needs walkies.

7. Swap the cocktails for the mocktails

Drinking excessive amounts of alcohol causes raised blood pressure – one of the biggest risk factors for having a heart attack. All those calories can also mean weight gain, another factor in heart disease. Try cutting down on the booze if you can, avoid binging, and squeeze in a few ‘dry’ days every week. There are some great alcohol free wines on the market plus some ‘mocktails’ taste as good as the real deal. Another fun way to hit your five a day!

8. Take a deep breath

Stress is another big factor in high blood pressure so try to stay calm and stress free as much as possible. Deep, slow breathing is the simplest technique for decreasing stress and therefore one of the most effective natural remedies for high blood pressure. You can do it wherever you are and whatever you’re doing – and it’s free!

9. Go Karaoke crazy

Researchers at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, found that choristers’ heartbeats synchronised when they sang together, bringing about a calming affect that could mean resilience to cardiac arrest. Dr Björn Vickhoff, who led the study says, “Song is a form of regular, controlled breathing… It helps you relax, and there are indications that it does provide a heart benefit.” Don’t fancy joining a choir? Then go wild with some guilt free singing in the shower.

10. Aim for eight hours between the sheets

Irregular or insufficient sleep – less than six hours a night – appears to be hazardous to our heart health, increasing the risk of stroke or heart attack. Sleep-deprived people have higher blood levels of stress hormones, a key player in cardiovascular disease, and lack of sleep can also alter your metabolism, making you prone to weight gain. If you can, keep your bedroom nice and quiet, try not to eat a big meal too late at night (which can ramp up your metabolism and make it difficult for your body to wind down), and avoid caffeine late in the day.

Source: BBC Broadcasting House, Portland Place, London

Pérolas de Sabedoria

A Little of Something …

“Having somewhere to go is home. Having someone to love is family. Having both is a blessing.”

Unknown

“It didn’t matter how big our house was; it mattered that there was love in it.”

Peter Buffett

“You don’t choose your family. They are God’s gift to you, as you are to them.”

Desmond Tutu

“We must take care of our families wherever we find them.”

Elizabeth Gilbert

“Family means no one gets left behind or forgotten.”

David Ogden Stiers

editor@activityvillage.co.uk

Aprendendo Inglês na Terceira Idade

There are many benefits of studying for older learners, such as increased self-confidence, increased feelings of health and well-being, reduced feelings of isolation, and increased engagement in the community. 

Many seniors wish to study a foreign language and there is now substantial evidence that they can learn a new language effectively. My experience is that senior learners are excellent language students for a number of reasons.

Life experience

Senior students have a wealth of life experience and when they bring this to the classroom they enrich the learning experience of the whole class. Our teachers comment that older learners are excellent students to have in the classroom as they are always happy to talk about their experiences and give their opinions on a wide range of topics.

Great motivation

Senior learners do not normally need a certificate, diploma or university credit; their motivation is intrinsic. They may study for intellectual enjoyment, to socialise with their peers or because it is something they have always wanted to do. In fact, senior learners are very often more highly motivated than younger learners. Their high level of motivation is a great advantage as this has been identified as one of the most important factors in determining successful language learning. The motivation of senior learners is reflected by the fact that they rarely miss a class, participate very actively in the classroom and always do their homework.

Social element

We have discovered that there is a strong social component in seniors attending English classes. They often attend class to mix with their peers, forming very strong friendships and socialising together after the class and even in their free time.

Attitude

Our experience is that senior learners have an extremely positive attitude toward language learning and life in general. They treat both their teachers and their classmates with the utmost respect and politeness. Our teachers often comment on how kind, considerate, and hardworking senior learners are, and what a pleasure they are to teach.

So our experience is that the life experience, motivation to learn, and positive attitude of senior learners provide them with many advantages as language learners. However, there are cognitive, affective and physiological factors which can affect senior language learning. We are going to identify these factors and then look at how you can adapt your courses and practices to meet the needs of older learners.

Helping students hear

Hearing loss may have a direct impact on learning and performance for senior learners. In order to decrease the negative effects of this auditory loss, teachers should try to accommodate the aging ear in a number of ways by:

• speaking clearly and ensuring that the students can see their face and lips.

• adjusting the volume for listenings and videos.

• repeating listening texts.

• using short films and videos which aid listening comprehension as students can see the face and lips of the speakers.

• ensuring that your classrooms have little background noise.

Helping students see

Defective vision increases dramatically as people age. Visual ability is particularly important in education as it is generally accepted that approximately 80% of all learning occurs through vision. To accommodate this loss in vision, here are some steps to follow:

• Use a larger print type for printed text.

• Make sure that senior students sit as close to the board as possible.

• Write very clearly on the board.

• Ensure that classrooms have a lot of natural light and that there is direct lighting for the whiteboard.

Mobility

As people age the body tends to lose some strength, flexibility and mobility. They may also suffer from arthritis and rheumatism. These changes may make it difficult for older learners to move around the classroom. To compensate for these changes we recommend doing the following things:

• Ensure that older learners have comfortable chairs and tables.

• Allow more time for older students to do whole class communicative activities where students have to stand up and move around the classroom.

Memory

Research indicates that cognitive development, recall, and problem solving may show decline with aging. In order to overcome this cognitive decline which may make it more difficult to learn a new language, teachers can help seniors develop and maintain their cognitive ability in a number of ways:

• Integrate memory exercises into classes. Use visual and auditory mnemonic devices, examples and memory associations to help seniors rehearse and later retrieve vocabulary and expressions from long-term memory.

• Systematically repeat and recycle grammar, vocabulary and expressions.

• Encourage students to draw on their wealth of experiences and to use cognitive strategies they have used successfully in the past in their current language learning environment.

• Allow more time for students to produce language without being interrupted.

Building confidence / Reducing stress

Many older learners fear failure and are more anxious than younger learners, perhaps this is because they accept the stereotype of the older learner as a poor language learner or because of previous unsuccessful attempts to learn a foreign language. Older learners need to feel comfortable and trust the teacher and the other students before they participate fully in the language classroom. A key role of the teacher is to reduce anxiety and build trust and self-confidence in the senior learner.

Here are some of the things teachers can do to reduce stress and build self-confidence in older adult learners:

• Find out what our older learners’ motivations are for learning a language and adjust our methodology accordingly.

• Use humanistic techniques to build empathy between the teacher and students, and among the students.

• Reduce the focus on error correction to build learners’ self-confidence and to promote language production.

• Avoid timed tests which may make senior learners anxious.

• Give senior students more time to complete activities.

• Promote a friendly and relaxed atmosphere in the classroom.

My experience is that any difficulties which senior learners may experience in the language classroom can be overcome through adjustments to the learning environment and material, attention to physical, affective and cognitive factors, and the use of an effective teaching methodology which focuses on the learning process rather than academic achievement.

Kieran Donaghy is teacher at UAB Idiomes, Barcelona. He is also the creator of http://film-english.com/, an award-winning website providing free resources for teachers wishing to use video effectively in their classrooms. 

Author:

Kieran Donaghy

Need a little more help with your professional development? Find a training course for your needs.

Como relaxar e manter a paz interior

1. Take a nature walk.

Studies have shown that getting outside in nature improves well-being, and you can also gain perspective from spring’s visual cues. For example, in fall, the changing leaves are a reminder of impermanence—just as they change colors and fall from the trees, so will whatever is stressing you out. Be the tree and let what is temporary fall away.

2. Focus on small tasks.

Practice mindfulness as you complete the smaller things on your list—housework, paperwork, yard work. Focus fully on what you are doing right here, right now, checking in with all your senses as you do your tasks. If your thoughts wander to something bigger looming in the future, gently guide your mind back to the task at hand. By staying in the present moment, you stop giving importance and attention to your past or future worries.

3. Watch or read something silly.

Entertainment is more than an escape. Studies have shown that laughter reduces the release of stress hormones in your body. Catch a silly movie, or read the latest book from your favorite funny guy or gal.

4. Sing (really).

Studies have found that singing has a positive impact on affect and anxiety, and may even reduce depression. So turn up the music and sing along or gather some friends for karaoke—if nothing else, it will make you laugh (see tip 3).

5. Try a basic breath practice meditation.

This session from Meditation Studio teacher Elisha Goldstein invites you to do nothing but watch your breath, which eventually makes it easier for you to focus on other tasks in your everyday life (without stressing). During this practice, it’s completely OK if you find yourself thinking about other things—just stay with your breath. “If all you did was notice your mind going off when it was wandering and gently brought it back over and over again,” Goldstein says, “your time would be well-spent

Source: https://www.yogajournal.com/guided-meditation-audio/meditation-studio-5-ways-to-beat-stress-this-fall?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_content=story1_title&utm_campaign=Wisdom_10022017

Em Português

1. Faça uma caminhada pela natureza.

Estudos demonstraram que ficar afastado na natureza melhora o bem-estar, e você também pode obter uma perspectiva das sugestões visuais da primavera. Por exemplo, no outono, as folhas que mudam são uma lembrança da impermanência – assim como eles mudam de cores e caem das árvores, assim como tudo o que forçá-lo a sair. Seja a árvore e deixe o que é temporário cair.

2. Concentre-se em pequenas tarefas.

Pratique a atenção plena ao completar as coisas menores na sua lista de tarefas domésticas, papelada, trabalho de quintal. Concentre-se totalmente no que você está fazendo aqui mesmo, agora mesmo, checando com todos os seus sentidos enquanto faz suas tarefas. Se seus pensamentos vagarem para algo maior que se aproxima no futuro, leve sua mente de volta à tarefa em questão. Ao permanecer no momento presente, você deixa de dar importância e atenção às suas preocupações passadas ou futuras.

3. Assista ou leia algo bobo.

O entretenimento é mais do que uma fuga. Estudos demonstraram que o riso reduz a liberação de hormônios do estresse em seu corpo. Pegue um filme bobo, ou leia o último livro de seu cara engraçado ou galão favorito.

4. Cante (realmente).

Estudos descobriram que o canto tem um impacto positivo sobre o afeto e a ansiedade e pode até reduzir a depressão. Então, aumente a música e cante ou colecione alguns amigos para karaokê – se nada mais, isso fará você rir (veja a dica 3).

5. Experimente uma meditação básica de respiração.

Esta sessão da professora de Meditação Studio, Elisha Goldstein, convida você a fazer nada além de assistir sua respiração, o que eventualmente torna mais fácil para você se concentrar em outras tarefas em sua vida cotidiana (sem estressar). Durante esta prática, é completamente bom se você se achar pensando em outras coisas – fique com a respiração. “Se tudo o que você fez foi notar sua mente desaparecendo quando estava vagando e gentilmente trouxe de volta uma e outra vez”, diz Goldstein, “seu tempo seria bem gasto

Fonte: https://www.yogajournal.com/guided-meditation-audio/meditation-studio-5-ways-to-beat-stress-this-fall?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_content=story1_title&utm_campaign=Wisdom_10022017

Quando já é tarde demais…

A Little Something …

“The biggest mistake I made is the one that most of us make while doing this. I did not live in the moment enough. This is particularly clear now that the moment is gone, captured only in photographs. There is one picture of the three on them sitting in the grass on a quilt in the shadow of the swing set on a summer day, ages 6, 4, and 1. And I wish I could remember what we ate, and what we talked about, and how they sounded, and how they looked when they slept that night. I wish I had not been in a hurry to get on to the next things: dinner, bath, book, bed. I wish I had treasured the doing a little more and the getting it done a little less.”

Anna Quindlen

Source: Activity Village

Em Português

Um pouco de algo …

“O maior erro que cometi é aquele que a maioria de nós faz ao fazer isso. Eu não vivi no momento suficiente. Isso é particularmente claro agora que o momento se foi, capturado apenas em fotografias. Há uma imagem dos três sobre eles sentados na grama em uma colcha na sombra do conjunto de balanço em um dia de verão, idades 6, 4 e 1. E eu gostaria de me lembrar do que comemos e do que falamos sobre, e como eles soaram, e como eles olharam quando eles dormiram naquela noite. Eu queria não ter tido pressa de seguir as próximas coisas: jantar, banho, livro, cama. Gostaria de ter atormentado fazer um pouco mais e fazer isso um pouco menos “.

Anna Quindlen

Um Pouco de Sabedoria por Diana Princesa de Gales.

Little Bit of Wisdom …

… from Diana, Princess of Wales

“Carry out a random act of kindness with no expectation of reward, safe in the knowledge that one day someone might do the same for you.”

“Family is the most important thing in the world.”

“I think the biggest disease the world suffers from in this day and age is the disease of people feeling unloved. I know that I can give love for a minute, for half an hour, for a day, for a month, but I can give.”

“Everyone of us needs to show how much we care for each other and, in the process, care for ourselves.”

“I want my boys to have an understanding of people’s emotions, their insecurities, people’s distress, and their hopes and dreams.”

“Hugs can do great amounts of good – especially for children.”

Source: editor@activityvillage.co.uk

Em português

Um Pouco de sabedoria …

… de Diana, princesa de Gales

“Realize um ato aleatório de bondade sem expectativa de recompensa, sabendo que um dia alguém pode fazer o mesmo por você”.

“A família é a coisa mais importante do mundo”.

“Acho que a maior doença que o mundo sofre neste dia e idade é a doença das pessoas que se sentem amadas. Eu sei que posso dar amor por um minuto, por meia hora, por um dia, por um mês, mas posso dar.”

“Todos nós precisamos mostrar o quanto nos cuidamos e, no processo, nos cuidamos”.

“Eu quero que meus meninos tenham uma compreensão das emoções das pessoas, suas inseguranças, angústia das pessoas e suas esperanças e sonhos”.

“Os abraços podem fazer grandes quantidades de bem – especialmente para crianças”.

Fonte: editor@activityvillage.co.uk

A Influência de um Professor

A Teacher’s Influence …

Teaching is and will always be my life. I love my students – kids, teenagers or adults. On the days I am not teaching, I feel empty. It is my great happiness to see my students grow and succeed in learning English.

Paula Lyra.

“I like a teacher who gives you something to take home to think about besides homework.” 

Lily Tomlin

“If kids come to us from strong, healthy functioning families, it makes our job easier. If they do not come to us from strong, healthy, functioning families, it makes our job more important.”

Barbara Colorose

“Teaching is the greatest act of optimism.” 

Colleen Wilcox

“I am not a teacher, but an awakener.” 

Robert Frost

“Teachers can change lives with just the right mix of chalk and challenges.”

Joyce Meyer

“Let us remember: One book, one pen, one child, and one teacher can change the world.”

Malala Yousafzai

“A word of encouragement from a teacher to a child can change a life.”

John C. Maxwell

“A teacher affects eternity; he can never tell where his influence stops.”

Henry Adams

“I touch the future. I teach.”

Christa McAuliffe