Palestra versus Public Talk

Você sabia que há diferenças entre uma palestra e uma fala ao público?

Seguem algumas explicações sobre essas diferenças e como saber usa lás quando necessário. 

Lectures vs Public Talk

Reflections on the difference between public and academic speech. What distinguishes a lecture from public talk? This table lists their distinguishing features.
PUBLIC TALK  –   LECTURE

Talks tend to create an emotional bond with the audience

Lectures aim to stimulate intellectual understanding

Talks persuade: they depend on specific words chosen to move and persuade the audience.

 Lectures inform: they depend on information for their impact, and the actual words that convey that information can be improvised.

Talks identify shared values: TED talk => the speaker talks about the importance of exploring the oceans to get to know better life on Earth and what to expect in the future

Lectures flow from someone who knows to someone who doesn’t: oceanography lecture: data and highly specific domain vocabulary: “downslope”, “salinity”, etc.

Talks rely on persuasive techniques: these may include not only information, but emotional pleas to maximise impact. A speaker generally shares conviction.

Lecturers rely on the informative value of content: their aim is to inform the audience. A lecturer usually shares expertise.

Talks seek to get the audience to agree with the speaker’s point of view: the aim of a speech is to persuade others to choose one option.

 Lectures tend to give listeners information they can use to make up their minds: a lecture clarifies what options are available.

At the end of a talk, members of the audience should feel they know and like the speaker: the speaker is one of them.

 At the end of a lecture, members of the audience may find it irrelevant whether they liked the lecturer, but they appreciate the new understanding they have reached.

Adapted from: Classroom
© Kevin Johnston

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